"Star"

"Star"

"Star"

"Dreamer"

"Star"

Star & Jay litter 2007

"Parker"

"Jude"

"Star" "Eve" "Ruger" "Sugar" "Asia"

 

 

 

 


Weimaraners

Parent Club: Weimaraner Club of America

Country of Origin: Germany.

General Appearance: A medium-sized gray dog, with fine aristocratic features. He should present a picture of grace, speed, stamina, alertness and balance. Above all, the dog's conformation must indicate the ability to work with great speed and endurance in the field

Height: Height at the withers: dogs, 25 to 27 inches; bitches, 23 to 25 inches. One inch over or under the specified height of each sex is allowable but should be penalized. Dogs measuring less than 24 inches or more than 28 inches and bitches measuring less than 22 inches or more than 26 inches shall be disqualified

Coat and Color: Short, smooth and sleek, solid color, in shades of mouse-gray to silver-gray, usually blending to lighter shades on the head and ears. A small white marking on the chest is permitted, but should be penalized on any other portion of the body. White spots resulting from injury should not be penalized. A distinctly long coat is a disqualification. A distinctly blue or black coat is a disqualification

Head: Moderately long and aristocratic, with moderate stop and slight median line extending back over the forehead. Rather prominent occipital bone and trumpets well set back, beginning at the back of the eye sockets. Measurement from tip of nose to stop equals that from stop to occipital bone. The flews should be straight, delicate at the nostrils. Skin drawn tightly. Neck clean-cut and moderately long. Expression kind, keen and intelligent. Ears-Long and lobular, slightly folded and set high. The ear when drawn snugly alongside the jaw should end approximately 2 inches from the point of the nose. Eyes-In shades of light amber, gray or blue-gray, set well enough apart to indicate good disposition and intelligence. When dilated under excitement the eyes may appear almost black. Teeth-Well set, strong and even; well-developed and proportionate to jaw with correct scissors bite, the upper teeth protruding slightly over the lower teeth but not more than 1/16 of an inch. Complete dentition is greatly to be desired. Nose-Gray. Lips and Gums-Pinkish flesh shades.

Body: The back should be moderate in length, set in a straight line, strong, and should slope slightly from the withers. The chest should be well developed and deep with shoulders well laid back. Ribs well sprung and long. Abdomen firmly held; moderately tucked-up flank. The brisket should extend to the elbow.

Forelegs: Straight and strong, with the measurement from the elbow to the ground approximately equaling the distance from the elbow to the top of the withers.

Hindquarters: Well-angulated stifles and straight hocks. Musculature well developed.

Feet: Firm and compact, webbed, toes well arched, pads closed and thick, nails short and gray or amber in color. Dewclaws-Should be removed.

Tail: Docked. At maturity it should measure approximately 6 inches with a tendency to be light rather than heavy and should be carried in a manner expressing confidence and sound temperament. A non-docked tail shall be penalized.

Gait: The gait should be effortless and should indicate smooth coordination. When seen from the rear, the hind feet should be parallel to the front feet. When viewed from the side, the top line should remain strong and level.

Temperament: The temperament should be friendly, fearless, alert and obedient.

Personality :Provided proper socialization has taken place, this breed gets along fine with other household pets. The Weimaraner will often get along fine with other dogs, and is friendly toward children. Because of its size smaller children should be watched close to be sure they don't get knocked down by a puppy playing. Although not unfriendly toward strangers, this dog will protect its family in times of danger.

Care: The short-haired Weimaraner has few grooming needs. Periodically use a rubber brush to remove dead hairs. Its ears must be checked to make sure they are clean.

Training: The Weimaraner is intelligent enough to understand what is expected of it. It is eager to please its handler, and learns quickly. The handler must be confident and firm, because this dog tend to tries to dominate.

Activity: This breed needs long walks and would prefer to work at field sports, jogging or going on horseback runs. Obedience training is also a good work out for them as it engages the brain and a good 30 session will wear them out as much as a 45 minute run.

Are you ready for a Weimaraner? Take the Quiz

Is a Weim Right for You?
The Weimaraner Standard describes the breed temperament as friendly, fearless, alert, and obedient, but this is but the half of its personality. Assertive, bold, loyal, and headstrong also fit, giving the dog a loving attitude with a willingness to take the upper paw in the family if the opportunity presents itself. Housebreaking can be a problem, as can destructive chewing.

Like most large hunting breeds, the Weimaraner needs lots of exercise and must be kept restrained to prevent him from ranging in search of game. Because he was developed as a hunting dog and still maintains those instincts, he may be dangerous to birds and small mammals. Unlike many hunting breeds, however, the Weimaraner is a house dog and does poorly when confined to a kennel.

This is a breed that needs obedience training to control his rambunctious nature. Owners should have a crate for the new puppy for help in house training and to protect furniture and woodwork from puppy teeth when the little rascal cannot be watched. Puppy classes and/or control exercises at home are essential for the Weimaraner the moment he enters the family. He must be taught all members of the family are to be obeyed. Training methods must be gentle and firm, for harsh treatment will sour his attitude.

Possible Health Issues

Gastric Torsion or GDV, bloat/torsion, twisted stomach

 

Five Important Things About Weimaraners

1. Weimaraners are very energetic animals...they are bred to hunt all day with their master. Changing this behavior changes the essential Weim. If you can not deal with this behavior, you should look at other, less rambunctious breeds!

2. Weim's are not soft mouthed like a Golden Retriever or Irish Setter. They are still the game hunter and some Weim's have a low tolerance for small fur bearing animals including cats and small dogs. Changing this behavior again changes the basic temperament of the dog.

3. Weim's can bark and if you are away from them too much and they are left to themselves, Weimaraners are like any other lonely dog, they will bark incessantly and develop bad habits or try escaping their surroundings.

4. Although Weimaraners are hunting dogs, they do not like living outdoors. They require your attention. They are the true, loyal, hunting companions in every respect, needing your friendship. Chaining a Weim outside will not work!

5. In spite of the folklore and myth surrounding the breed, the Weimaraner is not a wonder dog. Given the opportunity, he will still steal the pot roast off the dining room table when no one is looking!

This may seem like a lot of work, but a good owner/dog relationship could last around fifteen years. Longer than some marriages! The time and effort put into finding a dog that suits your needs and personality, whether it a Weimaraner or some other breed, will provide a rewarding experience for both of you over the life of the dog.

This Information is re-printed from the Weimaraner Club of America.


 

 
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